Invasive Rodent Eradication on Islands

By February 12, 2015.RECOMMENDED, Rodents, Workgroup 3

Author(s): GREGG HOWALD, C. JOSH DONLAN, JUAN PABLO GALV´AN, JAMES C. RUSSELL, JOHN PARKES, ARACELI SAMANIEGO, YIWEI WANG, DICK VEITCH, PIERO GENOVESI, MICHEL PASCAL, ALAN SAUNDERS, AND BERNIE TERSHY

Publication: Conservation Biology

Publication Date: 2007

Abstract: Invasive mammals are the greatest threat to island biodiversity and invasive rodents are likely responsible for the greatest number of extinctions and ecosystem changes. Techniques for eradicating rodents from islands were developed over 2 decades ago. Since that time there has been a significant development and application of this conservation tool. We reviewed the literature on invasive rodent eradications to assess its current state and identify actions to make it more effective. Worldwide, 332 successful rodent eradications have been undertaken; we identified 35 failed eradications and 20 campaigns of unknown result. Invasive rodents have been eradicated from 284 islands (47,628 ha). With the exception of two small islands, rodenticides were used in all eradication campaigns. Brodifacoum was used in 71% of campaigns and 91% of the total area treated. The most frequent rodenticide distribution methods ( from most to least) are bait stations, hand broadcasting, and aerial broadcasting. Nevertheless, campaigns using aerial broadcast made up 76% of the total area treated. Mortality of native vertebrates due to nontarget poisoning has been documented, but affected species quickly recover to pre-eradication population levels or higher. A variety of methods have been developed
to mitigate nontarget impacts, and applied research can further aid in minimizing impacts. Land managers
should routinely remove invasive rodents from islands.

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